Tag Archives: Famicom

Famista Evolution Interview with MCU

Features
MCU (Main Image)
(The following is a translation from the 06/07/2018 issue of Famitsu magazine.)

Interview With MCU, The First Artist to Sing a Theme Song For Famista!

The Famista series will feature a theme song for the first time in its 32 year history. And we're here with the artist who will sing "Famista Evolution", MCU of Kick The Can Crew!

MCU (Profile Image)Born 08/01/1973, and grew up in Sugamo in Tokyo. He's an MC for popular hip-hop group Kick The Can Crew.     Continue Reading

Double Dragon

Reviews
Double Dragon (Famicom) - Title Screen
Famicom/NES
04/08/1988 (Japan), 06/1988 (US), 1990 (PAL)
双截龍 (ダブルドラゴン)
Almost a year after the original arcade hit, Double Dragon was brought home to the Famicom. This is the first of the handful of home ports that Japan would see of this game, and the NES version is probably among the first to be seen throughout the rest of the world (the microcomputer versions don't have exact dates associated with them, other than just 1988). The Famicom port probably didn't deliver the experience that big fans of the arcade version wanted, but it succeeded on its own merits. Continue Reading

Nekketsu Kouha Kunio kun

Reviews
Famicom/NES
04/17/1987 (Japan), 01/1988 (US)
熱血硬派くにおくん
Hot Blooded Tough Guy Kunio
Renegade
Famicom ports of early arcade games often turned out to be far cries from their originals, though they meant well. Development on the Famicom just hadn't been refined to the point where truly accurate ports of these titles were feasible, and these were the days where arcade technology was so far beyond home console technology that it was often impossible. Kunio's Famicom port changes up a great many things from the original. The most noticeable is a graphical style that's significantly closer than the arcade version to that which the Kunio series would become so well known for in its next installment. The music is also incredibly faithful to the original version. There's an alternating 2 player mode here, which was typical for Famicom beat-em-ups of the time. Each player can also select one of three levels, which seem to do nothing more than change the stage backgrounds between daytime, dusk, and nighttime. Power ups will also appear periodically that will refill health, or temporarily increase strength or speed. Continue Reading

Hokuto no Ken 2: seikimatsu kyuuseishu densetsu

Reviews
Hokuto no Ken 2 - Title Screen
Famicom/NES
04/17/1987 (Japan), 04/1989 (US)
北斗の拳2 世紀末救世主伝説
Fist of the North Star 2: Legend of the Century's End Savior
Fist of the North Star
Marking the third Hokuto no Ken game released in a single year's time, Hokuto no Ken 2 is a followup to the first Shouei System developed game on the Famicom. Not only did the inferior of the two Hokuto no Ken games get the sequel in this case (the more deserving one being the Master System/Mark II game), but this one is also based on the second half of the series (taking place several years after Raoh's defeat). Popular opinion is that the second half was a mere shadow of the first, with weaker supporting characters and a far less engaging story. It also bears the same subtitle that the anime adaptation of Hokuto no Ken did from the beginning: "seikimatsu kyuuseishu densetsu" ("Legend of the Century's End Savior"). On top of getting a raw deal in terms of the source material, Hokuto no Ken 2 also had the misfortune of being released on the exact same day as the Famicom port of a genre-evolving beat-em-up: Nekketsu Kouha Kunio kun (Renegade). It's no wonder that these early Hokuto no Ken games have been largely forgotten. Continue Reading

Spartan X

Reviews
Famicom/NES
06/21/1985 (Japan), 10/1985 (US), 04/15/1987 (PAL)
スパルタンX
Kung Fu
We often assume that simplistic games don't have a very rich history, but Spartan X is a perfect example of why this isn't true. It acted not only as a door to a brand new genre that would rule a large portion of the late 80s and 90s, a potential pathway to multiple world-changing games, a licensed game (sort of) and a transitional game for some notable individuals. When playing "Kung Fu" (the name that it was released under in the US) on my NES as a kid around 1988, I was unable to get past the third floor and would think "This game seems a little primitive..." (little did I know at the time how old the game itself actually was). I truly had no idea how significant what I was playing actually was. Continue Reading
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