Tag Archives: MonHan

Monster Hunter Stories

Reviews
Monster Hunter Stories - Title Screen
Hardware: 3DS
10/08/2016 (Japan)
モンスターハンター ストーリーズ
The Monster Hunter franchise was no stranger to spin-off games by 2016. Not counting any of the handful of mobile games available (very few of which were in the style of a traditional Monster Hunter game), there were already three different MonHan Nikki: Poka Poka Airu Mura games (two on the PSP and one on the 3DS) and Airu de Puzzle (PSP). They were all very different experiences from the mainline Monster Hunter games in both visuals and game-play, and were all developed by studios other than Capcom (The Poka Poka Airu Mura games by From Software, and Airu de Puzzle by Natsume). But it was a little surprising that there hadn't yet been an attempt to make a JRPG that took place in the Monster Hunter universe. Capcom clearly took notice of this, and a JRPG is just what we would get from developer Marvelous in Monster Hunter Stories. Continue Reading

2013: A Year Reborn

Blog
2013 has been a bit of a strange year for me. It's the second year in a row that a particular set of personal issues have come to light, but it's also been a year of fairly great and interesting discoveries in the gaming world. I haven't played enough games that actually came out this year to make this into your typical "personal game of the year" post. As anyone who has read even a little bit of this site can probably guess, I'm constantly struggling to balance my gaming time between retro and modern games. That makes keeping up with the hot games of the year not always an easy thing to do. However I do want to briefly touch on the few games I did play that qualify. Continue Reading

MonHan-scoveries

Blog
I have been playing Monster Hunter 4 since the Japanese release date. If this were a past iteration of Monster Hunter (let's say, for example, Portable 3rd) my game clock would easily be over the 100 hour mark by now. My game clock in Monster Hunter 4 is just over 50 hours. As I'd mentioned in a previous article about my history with the Monster Hunter series, I'd gone through a bout of decreased interest with the series as of 3G/3 Ultimate on the 3DS/Wii U. However, I was really hoping that the changes brought about in 4 would spark my long held interest again. Well have they? I guess I can't answer "yes" completely given what I just said, so the answer is more like "Sort of". But I've begun to realize that it's because of an aspect of Monster Hunter that I somehow managed to forget about over time and a changing life situation. Continue Reading

Monster Hunter G

Reviews
Monster Hunter G Title Screen
Hardware: Playstation 2
01/20/2005 (Japan)
モンスターハンターG
Less than one year after the release of the original Monster Hunter, Capcom released the expansion: Monster Hunter G. From the moment Pugi (the adorable little pig that wanders around your house/the village from every game here on out) comes walking across the title screen snorting, the game shows us that we're in for something more than your average expansion. In fact Monster Hunter G does everything that a good expansion should and more: It improves on some of the original game's flaws, introduces conveniences that make it easier to play, and adds a lot of new content. It creates a template that all of the "G" expansions would follow from here on out. Continue Reading

Monster Hunter

Reviews
Monster Hunter Title Screen Image
Hardware: Playstation 2
03/11/2004 (Japan), 09/21/2004 (US), 05/27/2005 (PAL)
モンスターハンター
There was a time (namely before the HD era of gaming) that big game companies like Capcom were not afraid to take a chance on new franchises. Taking heavy inspiration Sega's Phantasy Star Online series as a base for its game play, it was in 2004 that the modern day Japanese gaming powerhouse began: the first entry in the Monster Hunter series was released. Though Capcom invented a brand new genre for this game called "Hunting Action", it was similar to its predecessor in many ways, with just enough different twists to feel like a brand new experience. The basic flow of the game involves accepting specific quests from within a hub world, then setting out into separate areas to complete objectives for that quest. The difference is that in Monster Hunter you're dropped into a prehistoric National Geographic Explorer where your opponents are dinosaurs, dragons, and other creatures that come right out of their natural environments. Though weapons and armor are constantly being upgraded throughout the game, in Monster Hunter there is an added sense of realism: It's done using parts carved right from the carcasses of the monsters themselves. Continue Reading