Metroid: Zero Mission

Reviews
Hardware: Game Boy Advance
05/27/2004 (Japan), 02/09/2004 (US), 04/08/2004 (PAL)
メトロイド ゼロミッション
Metroid was released on the Famicom Disk System and NES in 1986, and for its time it was a fantastic game. It practically invented a genre, and its influence on gaming in general simply cannot be denied. As the years passed and its sequels were released though (Metroid II in 1991 (US) and 1992 (Japan and Europe) on the Game Boy, and Super Metroid in 1994 on the Super Famicom/Super NES), the original quickly began to look and feel its age. It was Super Metroid in particular that really put it out to pasture, for all of the reasons that make it appear on many top SNES games lists. It just did everything that the original Metroid did, but orders of magnitude better. And it added something that the original was not too big on: Atmosphere. Continue Reading

Gundam Musou International

Reviews
Hardware: XBox 360
12/27/2007 (Japan), 08/28/2007 (US), 11/09/2007 (PAL)
ガンダム無双インターナショナル
Dynasty Warriors: Gundam
In Japan, Gundam Musou was originally released on 03/01/2007, only on the Playstation 3. It came to the Playstation 3 and XBox 360 simultaneously in the US on 08/28/2007 and to other PAL regions on 11/09/2007 as Dynasty Warriors: Gundam, with localized voices. Surprisingly, Gundam Musou would also be released in Japan on the XBox 360 later in the year as Gundam Musou International. Continue Reading

Gundam Musou

Reviews
Hardware: Playstation 3
03/01/2007 (Japan), 08/28/2007 (US), 11/09/2007 (PAL)
ガンダム無双
Dynasty Warriors: Gundam
There have been a ton of different Gundam games over the years, but the best regarded ones tended to be either fighting games or strategy RPGs. Gundam Musou was the first time that Koei Tecmo put a separate licensed property into a game in its already long running history of Musou titles, which until now had been completely focused around characters from Chinese or Japanese history. This decision didn't make a lot of Gundam fans happy though: The less artful, repetitive nature of a beat-em-up in the Musou series probably just felt too far away from those Gundam games everyone loved. But does Gundam really fit so badly into the Musou template? Sure it doesn't have the depth of a good fighting game or require the thought of a strategy RPG, but I'd argue that the fit turned out to be a rather good one. Continue Reading

Soul Sacrifice Delta

Reviews
Hardware: Vita
03/06/2014 (Japan)
ソウル・サクリファイス デルタ
It has practically become a ritual in the world of Monster Hunter clones (though please see my article on the original Soul Sacrifice to find out why calling this game one may not be fair) to release an expanded version of a game approximately one year after the original has released. Monster Hunter itself started the trend with Monster Hunter G, and has done the same thing for practically every main installment in the series since. You can usually expect one of these expansions to add a ton of new quests and weapons. If you're lucky, you may get a few new minor features, bug fixes or optimizations. They really are for fans of the first game who just want to play some new content and are willing to pay the price of a whole new game for it. I'm very happy to say that Soul Sacrifice Delta is a huge exception to this rule. Everyone involved really went above and beyond to create what, in many ways, feels almost like a whole new game. Continue Reading

Hokuto no Ken

Reviews
Hardware: Famicom/NES
08/10/1986 (Japan)
北斗の拳
Fist of the North Star
Not even one month after the very first Hokuto no Ken game on the Sega Master System/Mark III came the first series installment on the Famicom/NES. Those who are knowledgeable on the history of the NES or Hokuto no Ken games may know that a game was released outside of Japan as "Fist of the Northstar", however it was not this game. That release corresponds to Japan's Hokuto no Ken 2 on the Famicom. The Master System/Mark III game its faults and oddities, but was a fairly good side-scrolling beat-em-up game at the time, and generally was a credit to its source material. Hokuto no Ken on the Famicom is the opposite of all of these things. Continue Reading