Tag Archives: beat-em-ups

Capcom Belt Action Collection with Rensuke Oshikiri (High Score Girl)

Famitsu Translations
Final Fight Featured Image
Publish Date: 12/13/2018
Capcom Belt Action Collection (Capcom Beat 'Em Up Bundle) consists of 7 titles that exemplify Capcom's beat 'em ups of the 1990s. "Powered Gear" ("Armored Warriors") and "Battle Circuit" are ported from their arcade versions for the very first time, and "Battle Circuit" and "Captain Commando" allow for 4-player simultaneous play. All titles offer online play, allow players to join in partway through a game, or even just spectate. Rensuke Oshikiri is a manga author that loves arcades, and debuted with "Masashi! Ushiro da!". His masterpiece "High Score Girl" was made into an anime in 2018, and has gained quite a bit of popularity. The series consists of "High Score Girl Continue" (volumes 1-5) and "High Score Girl" (volumes 6-9). The 10th volume is planned for release on 03/25/2019. While the downloadable version is already available, the packaged version of the Capcom Belt Action Collection will soon be released. We've interviewed manga author Rensuke Oshikiri about the charms of beat 'em ups, in order to convey the charms that this collection has to offer. Continue Reading

Our Nostalgic Games: Double Dragon

Famitsu Translations
Our Nostalgic Games - Double Dragon Arcade Header
Publish Date: 11/08/2018

Our Nostalgic Games ~Retro Gamer Round-table~ #204

Editors passionately discussing games playable on modern hardware that are just as good as they've ever been!

Arcade Archives Neo Geo (PS4) - Double Dragon

A beat-em-up released from Technos Japan in 1987. You can use boulders and boxes to attack in these side scrolling stages that have depth. You can also play with two players simultaneously. Original Release Year: 1987 Hardware: Arcade Date of Digital Release: 11/22/2014 Maker: Hamster Continue Reading

Juuouki

Reviews
Altered Beast - Title Screen
Hardware: Arcade
06/1988 (Japan), 08/1988 (US)
獣王記
Chronicle of The Beast King
Altered Beast
While Altered Beast is not Sega's entry in the beat-em-up genre (that honor goes to the Master System/Mark III Hokuto no Ken/Fist of the Northstar game), it is the first entry into the genre for them using an original property. Sega was already known for their high quality arcade games (at least on average) at this point, but they were entering into a genre that had some real heavy hitters in recent years (most notably Nekketsu Kouha Kunio kun/Renegade and Double Dragon, both from Technos Japan). Would Altered Beast innovate in the brawler genre the same way Sega had innovated with some of their other arcade games? Continue Reading

The Ninja Warriors

Reviews
The NInja Warriors - Title Screen
Hardware: Arcade
02/1988 (Japan), 1988 (US, EU)
ニンジャウォーリアーズ
Just a year prior, Nekketsu Kouha Kunio kun and Double Dragon began to change the beat-em-up landscape by taking things off of a single plane, allowing characters to move up and down on the screen. However these sorts of trends usually take time to catch on, and games take time to develop. So The Ninja Warriors follows in the footsteps of the genre's grandfather Spartan X, and remains on "the belt". And if not for the the previously mentioned titles, the advancements that The Ninja Warriors introduced may well have made it as significant to the genre. Continue Reading

Double Dragon

Reviews
Double Dragon Arcade - Title Screen
Hardware: Arcade
06/1987 (Japan), 1987 (US), 1987 (PAL)
双截龍 (ダブルドラゴン)
Yoshihisa Kishimoto and his team significantly evolved the beat-em-genre with Nekketsu Kouha Kunio kun/Renegade in 1986. Technos Japan naturally wanted them to make more of these games, so they were tasked with just that. June 1987 would be the arcade birth of not only an even bigger success for Technos Japan than Kunio kun, but also the birth of another beat-em-up franchise and further evolution of the genre: Double Dragon. Originally envisioned as a direct sequel to Kunio kun, Kishimoto was given two mandates: This game should allow for 2 players simultaneously and have a bigger international appeal. Given that Kunio kun had to be visually gutted in order to sell it overseas as Renegade, a direct sequel was pretty much out of the question. So instead of taking inspiration from the Tsuppari genre and his own high school fighting experiences, Kishimoto pulled from another source that was dear to him: Bruce Lee. He particularly loved "Enter the Dragon", and so he came up with not only the title of the game but also the names of the protagonists (Billy and Jimmy Lee) from these sources. Continue Reading
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